The Clinical Research Process

Clinical trials (also called “clinical studies” or “research studies”) help determine if medicines, medical devices, and tests are safe and effective.

Why join a clinical trial?

Get early access to new medicines

Clinical studies offer more care options for patients suffering from common, unique, and rare health conditions.

Help move science forward

Clinical studies offer a way for almost anyone — regardless of their background — to help improve human health and wellbeing.

Receive compensation if you qualify

Most Meridian studies offer payment for time and travel. We'll let you know what to expect during your first phone call with Meridian.

Give hope to people worldwide

Clinical trials offer hope for many people and an opportunity to help researchers find better treatments for others in the future.

Talk to a Meridian enrollment specialist...

Midwest

Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota

(402) 934-7563

Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-Noon (CT)

South and East Coast

Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, Virginia

(912) 623-2240

Mon.-Th., 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (ET)

Infographic: Clinical Trial Phases

More Questions and Answers

To learn more about clinical research, visit ClinicalTrials.gov.

Clinical trials are conducted to allow safety and efficacy data to be collected for new drugs, medical devices, or treatment techniques. Depending on the type of product and the stage of its development, healthy volunteers and/or patients enroll into small pilot studies initially, followed by larger scale studies in patients that often compare the new product with the currently prescribed treatment.

As positive safety and efficacy data is gathered, more patients are typically involved. Clinical trials can vary in size from a single center in one country to multi-center mega-trials across several countries.